Psalter’s Restaurant @ The Luttrell Arms


The Luttrell Arms Hotel is situated in Dunster, a rather splendid medieval village in beautiful West Somerset. Enclosed within the ancient walls of this 15th century hostelry, is the Psalter’s Restaurant. I was invited to stay at the Luttrell by Head Chef Barrie Tucker, with a view to trying out the culinary offering. Barrie, locally born, is very much at the helm of the brigade of chefs there, and is the driving force behind the food on offer.

I arrived on Sunday afternoon, after a not so long drive from North Devon, and was immediately impressed by the professional, courteous manner of the staff. I was at once ushered to my room, interestingly called Rodney (he wasn’t in there thankfully), and I soon found myself relaxing within my sumptuous and spacious surroundings.


My accommodation was supremely comfortable, with a vast queen size bed, sofa, reading chair, writing desk (how thoughtful), TV, and of course a lovely, modern en suite bathroom. I would say that Rodney was a mixture of modern decoration and antique style; and jolly nice it was too. I felt like an absolute king peering out of my second storey window over the historic Yarn Market below.

Having earlier spent some time unwinding in the bar – not far from the fire, I navigated my way eventually to the Psalter’s Restaurant, whereupon I was ushered to my cosy corner table. The menu was most definitely stimulating, offering a really good choice of varied and appetizing dishes.


Not wishing for the grass to grow under one’s proverbial feet so to speak, I quickly selected the wine for the night, which of course is the altogether superb Malbec – having an ‘explosive red berry nose with chocolate and soft vanilla notes.’ Sounds like a meal all by itself…

Now for the food. I opted for the Pheasant and Cranberry Terrine, followed by Roast Rump of Beef with Pepper sauce. The terrine was beautifully presented and prepared, resembling a work of art. It really looked fabulous on the plate, and tasted equally delicious too. I considered this a perfect way to begin the evening, and I couldn’t wait for the next course.


The Roast Rump of Beef with Pepper sauce arrived shortly after. The beef was rare, and I’m not sure that there was a choice with this, but either way, the two slices of beef draped across my very stylish graphite colour plate were melt in the mouth delicious. The attendant pepper sauce, with a hint of sweetness, was quite unlike anything I had ever tried before and extremely moreish.

Keeping the beef company on the plate were spinach, wild mushrooms and fondant potatoes. A very tasty, balanced and mouth-watering offering. All the while, this was being washed down with my ‘Hefty, deep fruited’ Malbec, making this a somewhat enjoyable experience.


My dessert choice for the night was Treacle Tart with Lemon Curd and Lemon Curd Ice Cream. This was not as overpowering as it sounds, but was in fact a delicately balanced finish to a wonderful evening. When you’re cooking at this level, it’s not always about strong flavours but something a bit more subtle.


The next morning, on the way to breakfast, I checked out the terrace overlooking the compact courtyard, which in turn leads out to the lovely Secret Garden overlooking the grounds of Dunster Castle. In warmer weather, this would be a marvelous place to eat and drink. I eventually exited the Luttrell arms after an immensely satisfying Full English Breakfast, containing hog’s pudding and potato cake. I think anyone who stays at the Luttrell will honestly have little to complain about, and will find it a very refreshing break.



The #EatExmoor Food & Drink Trade Show


Wednesday 7th February sees the inaugural Eat Exmoor Food & Drink trade show, at the Beach Hotel in Minehead. The #EatExmoor initiative is a joint project from the Exmoor National Park and Visit Exmoor; the tourism authority for this special area. Local producers, chefs and hospitality providers are invited along for a day of networking, cooking demonstrations, informative, interesting and helpful talks about how to maximise your business, in and around the national park.

The day will also be celebrating the launch of the #EatExmoor Guide and the #EatExmoor Marketing Toolkit. So, if you are connected to the hospitality industry in the Exmoor area, you know where to come: The Beach Hotel, Minehead 10-4pm. Click on the link below for the day’s programme of events.

The #EatExmoor Food & Drink Trade Show Programme of Events

The Royal Oak Inn, Winsford.

The Royal Oak Inn, Winsford. Image courtesy of Julia Amies-Green Photography

Sat in the bay window of the charming Royal Oak in Winsford, near the log burner and of course the bar, it’s easy for a feeling of contentment to wash over you. Winsford is not a village on the main road, so you need to take a bit of a diversion to get there, but it’s well worth it.

There has been an inn on this site for possibly over 800 years, and present owners Mark and Sally Bradley, have been here for 4 of those years. David Sylvester, the talented and hard-working Head Chef, is a local guy and has lived and worked in and around Winsford for over 27 years. And for much of that time, David has worked at the Oak. Which is why, no doubt, it is a watering-hole of repute.

David Sylvester
Head Chef, David Sylvester. Image courtesy of Julia Amies-Green Photography

So onto the food, because that’s what we came here for. The Oak has an interesting and altogether inviting menu, including the intriguing homemade filled bread rolls, such as: Roast Beef & Horseradish and Prawns in Marie Rose Sauce. At £7 each, I would say they were definitely worth a pop.

Other delights on the menu to be found are: Steak & Exmoor Ale Pie – Homemade Proper Pie with Mash or Chips and Trio of Park Sausages, Grain Mustard Mash with Rich Onion Gravy. David also offers his discerning clientèle a range of 7 homemade desserts, truly refreshing when so much of what is offered these days comes straight out of the freezer.

However, it was to the offering chalked up on the specials board above the fireplace that I was irresistibly drawn. After no small amount of deliberation, I opted for Roast Lamb Rump with Rosemary Jus. And I have to say that this was an excellent choice.

The locally sourced Exmoor lamb from a butcher in South Molton was succulent, delicious and generous on the plate, and with the accompanying Ratte potatoes, rosemary jus and ring of cress encircling the meat, it was also perfectly presented too. The main dish was attended by a generous helping of buttered vegetables.

Roast Lamb Rump with Rosemary Jus

The thing about this dish is simplicity. There was nothing pretentious about it; it was simple, beautiful, full of flavours and textures and most of all, filling. The cost of the meal was £17 which was good value for money I think in a hostelry such as the Royal Oak.

It soon became quite busy during the lunchtime, which is encouraging considering that this lovely old pub, as previously stated, is somewhat out-of-the-way and we are well outside of the holiday season for Exmoor, in the lull after Christmas. With David at the culinary helm, I think the Royal Oak is set for another busy and fruitful season.


Woods Bar and Restaurant, Dulverton.

If you ever find yourself in Dulverton, no doubt you will have noticed signs that proudly proclaim that you have now arrived at the gateway to Exmoor. True enough I’m sure, but instead of driving through, you should take some time to stay awhile and explore this charming little Somerset village. And if you are looking for food and drink, and shelter from the cold, then look no further than Woods Bar and Restaurant tucked away up Bank Square. Sit yourself cosily by the bar and the open log fire, and you’ll find it hard to imagine a greater level of enjoyment on a chilly, December afternoon.

Ed Heard has been the Head Chef at Woods now for about 6 years, and has certainly made his mark here in this perennially busy bar and restaurant. Ed is certainly a prolific, local talent, and he is very ably assisted by both Lloyd and Louise in the kitchen. The waiting and bar staff are friendly and professional too. Woods has a delightful ambiance, and I recommend that you visit here when you’re next in Dulverton.


I arrived just after midday, and the restaurant was pretty much empty. However, within a very short space of time, it soon filled up and was packed to the gunwales with hungry customers. Woods was then replete with that pleasing hubbub that you get when you have a room full of happy, relaxed people.

Having ordered a local ale, my attention turned to the menu. Filled with delights such as the Northcombe Lamb Burger, with Cheese and Barbecue Sauce, or the Slow Roast Somerset Pork with Black Pudding, I was irresistibly drawn to the very seasonal Roasted Pheasant Breast, Fondant Potato, Sprouts, Chestnuts, Wild Mushrooms and Wholegrain Mustard Veloute. And at £13.50, I would say it represents remarkable value for money.


I think the first thing to say about this dish is delicious. I know that might sound stunningly obvious, but it just was. Oozing with flavour in fact; the kind of flavour that just makes you want more and more. I can’t say that I’ve eaten a lot of pheasant in my time, but think after this little culinary wonder, I think I might be eating it a lot more in the days to come. Whether or not future pheasant dishes served in other restaurants live up to this high standard, we shall just have to see.

Presentation? Loved it. Colourful, interesting, different and not overpowering. So, adding together delightful, cosy, rural Westcountry ambiance, friendly staff, great ales and a knockout, value for money seasonal dish, I would say that was a jolly big success. Well done to owners Paddy & Sally and Chef Ed Heard and his team. Keep on doing what you’re doing, and I’m sure we’ll all be happy for eons to come!

Exmoor Live @ the Dunster Show 2017

Click on the link below to view a short, but highly entertaining video about this great event I was privileged to take part in. Video courtesy of Fly Monkeys Limited and Julia Amies-Green Photography. Enjoy!

Exmoor Live Cookery Demonstration, Dunster in Somerset

Photo courtesy of Julia Amies-Green Photography.

The Pyne Arms, East Down

The Pyne Arms in North Devon is situated in the beautiful and peaceful hamlet of East Down. Run by couple, Ellis and Amie Pannell, this gastro pub is now most definitely on the proverbial map.

I called in last Sunday on the off-chance of a spare table (booking is advised), and I was suitably rewarded. Glass of Moretti in hand, I scoured the menu but it really didn’t take long before I settled on the day’s dining choice. 

I opted for the ‘Heal Farm Rump of Beef (locally sourced of course), Yorkshire Pudding and Horseradish.’ What emerged from the kitchen was perfectly cooked slices of beef draped over fluffy roast potatoes, alongside a rather large Yorkshire pudding. Accompanying this mouthwatering plateful, was a colourful selection of five vegetables, imaginatively presented to tempt and tease the palate no doubt.

The Pyne Arms at East Down certainly gets my vote  and I shall be returning soon I am sure…

The Exmoor Live Cookery Demo

Friday 18th August saw the 2nd incarnation of the Exmoor Live cookery demonstration, in a suitably grand marquee at the 171st annual Dunster Show.

Showcasing their formidable culinary acumen, we were treated to an interesting range of cookery demonstrations, featuring 6 top chefs from across Devon and Somerset.

Dishes on offer included a mouthwatering Venison Carpaccio, the slightly abstract but altogether delicious Pork Schnitzel and an oh so tempting trifle made with a locally distilled gin. 

The event was extremely well attended and well deserved credit goes to Chef Andrew Dixon, ably assisted by Chef Olivier Certain, who together organised this very successful event.

The Dunster Show


On Friday 18th August, the 171st Dunster Show will be held once again in the fields nestling behind Dunster Castle. Always a great success and highly enjoyable, this annual Somerset country fair is set to attract thousands of visitors once again. And there will of course be a cookery demonstration organised and led by Chefs Andrew Dixon and Olivier Certain. Joining them this year for the second year now will be Ed Heard along with newcomers to the cookery demo, Ellis Pannell and Barrie Tucker. See you there!

Download the John Raby’s Food & Travel flyer here

Espresso Seafood Bar and Grill.

There’s nothing better than whiling away a few hours by the seaside. And there’s also nothing better than dining in the company of long standing friends too.

On a hot, sunny afternoon Andrew and I came to the Espresso Seafood Bar and Grill in Ilfracombe, on the beautiful North Devon coast. Thankfully, a gentle sea breeze was in attendance to cool things down. 

A discussion about oysters ensued between us, and soon enough we were drawn inexorably to the Deluxe Shellfish Platter – which is what we ordered. Tempted by a spread of Lobsters, Oysters, Crab, Crevettes, Clams, Prawns, Scallops, Mussels and Cockles; you can see it wasn’t a difficult choice to make. 

Now this is where I have to come clean. Shamefully, for someone who has lived on the coast most of their life, I have to grudgingly admit that I am indeed an oyster virgin. Thought I’d just get that one out of the way. Well I was until yesterday anyway. 

I think what I want to say at this point is: “Oysters, where have you been all my life?” Well my friend Andy, who is also a top, local chef showed me the way: Grab the oyster shell, squeeze a few drops of fresh lemon on the aforementioned mollusc, add some shallot vinegar and a tiny smidgen of fiery tobacco and it’s down the hatch. 

That was definitely a culinary watershed for me because later on that day, I was pining for oysters again. “Where for at thou o clam of my desire?” Hmmm, I guess they’ll have to wait for the next trip out, which now can’t come soon enough. 

Further instruction was received from my friend and fellow foodie on dismembering the crab and lobster too (I clearly need to get out more), which proved to be yet another culinary voyage of discovery. And a very tasty one at that too.

I wish you could have been there because the smell of the sea was powerfully wafting off the two tier tray in front of us. This isn’t a particularly cheap offering, but worth every penny. If you love seafood, you’ll be in heaven. 

Washed down with a classic bottle of chilled white, it was just the ticket for a sunny day at the seaside. I also enjoyed a Samuel Adams Boston Lager too, which is a rare find in these parts. It was altogether agreeable, and nice to see it make an appearance after discovering it for the first time on a trip to New York a few years ago. 

No doubt I shall be returning for a repeat performance and I encourage you to try it yourself. This surely is what life on the North Devon coast is all about: locally sourced, fresh produce pulled straight from the ocean and lovingly served with impeccable presentation and flair.

Pappardelle’s, Arundel.


If you ever find yourself in historic and beautiful Arundel, at the bottom of the main street on the right, you will discover not one but two Italian restaurants. In fact, two restaurants in one.

Now that I have sufficiently piqued your attention, I will explain. What you’ve got, rather cleverly, are two dining experiences under one roof. Bottom floor, you have ‘Osteria,’ which serves some Italian food and also some other non-Italian dining choices too.

Osteria is really just an Italian term for a restaurant that serves good food, beer and wine – slightly lower in the pecking order than a Ristorante or Trattoria.

Anyway having said all that, my friend and I proceeded upstairs to Pappardelle’s which is the proper Italian Ristorante side of the business. Here, we were welcomed by one Jan Marco of Genoa, Italy.


The evening commenced with the mandatory but altogether scrumptious ciabatta with olive oil and balsamic vinegar. This was followed by a simply stunning beet cured salmon, with capers, horseradish and ciabatta (again).

Having learnt from a recent trip to the Emilia Romagna region of Italy that Spaghetti Bolognese is not actually an authentic Italian dish, I ordered the more accurate Tagliatelle Bolognese – with lamb.

Spaghetti Bolognese is an adaption of the real thing which is only ever made with Tagliatelle and not spaghetti. It’s also a lot less tomato based than what we’re used too here in the UK.

Either way, the version I was served was delicious, and whilst not entirely accurate, was much closer to the Ragu I had eaten in Bologna. It looked amazing and was thoroughly satisfying.

Washed down with a carafe of house wine, a Barberra 2014 described in the menu as having juicy cherry and damson fruit flavours, I couldn’t have asked for more.

I was not disappointed in any way with the food, ambience or warm and friendly service, and will definitely be returning sometime soon.