Psalter’s Restaurant @ The Luttrell Arms


The Luttrell Arms Hotel is situated in Dunster, a rather splendid medieval village in beautiful West Somerset. Enclosed within the ancient walls of this 15th century hostelry, is the Psalter’s Restaurant. I was invited to stay at the Luttrell by Head Chef Barrie Tucker, with a view to trying out the culinary offering. Barrie, locally born, is very much at the helm of the brigade of chefs there, and is the driving force behind the food on offer.

I arrived on Sunday afternoon, after a not so long drive from North Devon, and was immediately impressed by the professional, courteous manner of the staff. I was at once ushered to my room, interestingly called Rodney (he wasn’t in there thankfully), and I soon found myself relaxing within my sumptuous and spacious surroundings.


My accommodation was supremely comfortable, with a vast queen size bed, sofa, reading chair, writing desk (how thoughtful), TV, and of course a lovely, modern en suite bathroom. I would say that Rodney was a mixture of modern decoration and antique style; and jolly nice it was too. I felt like an absolute king peering out of my second storey window over the historic Yarn Market below.

Having earlier spent some time unwinding in the bar – not far from the fire, I navigated my way eventually to the Psalter’s Restaurant, whereupon I was ushered to my cosy corner table. The menu was most definitely stimulating, offering a really good choice of varied and appetizing dishes.


Not wishing for the grass to grow under one’s proverbial feet so to speak, I quickly selected the wine for the night, which of course is the altogether superb Malbec – having an ‘explosive red berry nose with chocolate and soft vanilla notes.’ Sounds like a meal all by itself…

Now for the food. I opted for the Pheasant and Cranberry Terrine, followed by Roast Rump of Beef with Pepper sauce. The terrine was beautifully presented and prepared, resembling a work of art. It really looked fabulous on the plate, and tasted equally delicious too. I considered this a perfect way to begin the evening, and I couldn’t wait for the next course.


The Roast Rump of Beef with Pepper sauce arrived shortly after. The beef was rare, and I’m not sure that there was a choice with this, but either way, the two slices of beef draped across my very stylish graphite colour plate were melt in the mouth delicious. The attendant pepper sauce, with a hint of sweetness, was quite unlike anything I had ever tried before and extremely moreish.

Keeping the beef company on the plate were spinach, wild mushrooms and fondant potatoes. A very tasty, balanced and mouth-watering offering. All the while, this was being washed down with my ‘Hefty, deep fruited’ Malbec, making this a somewhat enjoyable experience.


My dessert choice for the night was Treacle Tart with Lemon Curd and Lemon Curd Ice Cream. This was not as overpowering as it sounds, but was in fact a delicately balanced finish to a wonderful evening. When you’re cooking at this level, it’s not always about strong flavours but something a bit more subtle.


The next morning, on the way to breakfast, I checked out the terrace overlooking the compact courtyard, which in turn leads out to the lovely Secret Garden overlooking the grounds of Dunster Castle. In warmer weather, this would be a marvelous place to eat and drink. I eventually exited the Luttrell arms after an immensely satisfying Full English Breakfast, containing hog’s pudding and potato cake. I think anyone who stays at the Luttrell will honestly have little to complain about, and will find it a very refreshing break.



The #EatExmoor Food & Drink Trade Show


Wednesday 7th February sees the inaugural Eat Exmoor Food & Drink trade show, at the Beach Hotel in Minehead. The #EatExmoor initiative is a joint project from the Exmoor National Park and Visit Exmoor; the tourism authority for this special area. Local producers, chefs and hospitality providers are invited along for a day of networking, cooking demonstrations, informative, interesting and helpful talks about how to maximise your business, in and around the national park.

The day will also be celebrating the launch of the #EatExmoor Guide and the #EatExmoor Marketing Toolkit. So, if you are connected to the hospitality industry in the Exmoor area, you know where to come: The Beach Hotel, Minehead 10-4pm. Click on the link below for the day’s programme of events.

The #EatExmoor Food & Drink Trade Show Programme of Events

The Royal Oak Inn, Winsford.

The Royal Oak Inn, Winsford. Image courtesy of Julia Amies-Green Photography

Sat in the bay window of the charming Royal Oak in Winsford, near the log burner and of course the bar, it’s easy for a feeling of contentment to wash over you. Winsford is not a village on the main road, so you need to take a bit of a diversion to get there, but it’s well worth it.

There has been an inn on this site for possibly over 800 years, and present owners Mark and Sally Bradley, have been here for 4 of those years. David Sylvester, the talented and hard-working Head Chef, is a local guy and has lived and worked in and around Winsford for over 27 years. And for much of that time, David has worked at the Oak. Which is why, no doubt, it is a watering-hole of repute.

David Sylvester
Head Chef, David Sylvester. Image courtesy of Julia Amies-Green Photography

So onto the food, because that’s what we came here for. The Oak has an interesting and altogether inviting menu, including the intriguing homemade filled bread rolls, such as: Roast Beef & Horseradish and Prawns in Marie Rose Sauce. At £7 each, I would say they were definitely worth a pop.

Other delights on the menu to be found are: Steak & Exmoor Ale Pie – Homemade Proper Pie with Mash or Chips and Trio of Park Sausages, Grain Mustard Mash with Rich Onion Gravy. David also offers his discerning clientèle a range of 7 homemade desserts, truly refreshing when so much of what is offered these days comes straight out of the freezer.

However, it was to the offering chalked up on the specials board above the fireplace that I was irresistibly drawn. After no small amount of deliberation, I opted for Roast Lamb Rump with Rosemary Jus. And I have to say that this was an excellent choice.

The locally sourced Exmoor lamb from a butcher in South Molton was succulent, delicious and generous on the plate, and with the accompanying Ratte potatoes, rosemary jus and ring of cress encircling the meat, it was also perfectly presented too. The main dish was attended by a generous helping of buttered vegetables.

Roast Lamb Rump with Rosemary Jus

The thing about this dish is simplicity. There was nothing pretentious about it; it was simple, beautiful, full of flavours and textures and most of all, filling. The cost of the meal was £17 which was good value for money I think in a hostelry such as the Royal Oak.

It soon became quite busy during the lunchtime, which is encouraging considering that this lovely old pub, as previously stated, is somewhat out-of-the-way and we are well outside of the holiday season for Exmoor, in the lull after Christmas. With David at the culinary helm, I think the Royal Oak is set for another busy and fruitful season.


Woods Bar and Restaurant, Dulverton.

If you ever find yourself in Dulverton, no doubt you will have noticed signs that proudly proclaim that you have now arrived at the gateway to Exmoor. True enough I’m sure, but instead of driving through, you should take some time to stay awhile and explore this charming little Somerset village. And if you are looking for food and drink, and shelter from the cold, then look no further than Woods Bar and Restaurant tucked away up Bank Square. Sit yourself cosily by the bar and the open log fire, and you’ll find it hard to imagine a greater level of enjoyment on a chilly, December afternoon.

Ed Heard has been the Head Chef at Woods now for about 6 years, and has certainly made his mark here in this perennially busy bar and restaurant. Ed is certainly a prolific, local talent, and he is very ably assisted by both Lloyd and Louise in the kitchen. The waiting and bar staff are friendly and professional too. Woods has a delightful ambiance, and I recommend that you visit here when you’re next in Dulverton.


I arrived just after midday, and the restaurant was pretty much empty. However, within a very short space of time, it soon filled up and was packed to the gunwales with hungry customers. Woods was then replete with that pleasing hubbub that you get when you have a room full of happy, relaxed people.

Having ordered a local ale, my attention turned to the menu. Filled with delights such as the Northcombe Lamb Burger, with Cheese and Barbecue Sauce, or the Slow Roast Somerset Pork with Black Pudding, I was irresistibly drawn to the very seasonal Roasted Pheasant Breast, Fondant Potato, Sprouts, Chestnuts, Wild Mushrooms and Wholegrain Mustard Veloute. And at £13.50, I would say it represents remarkable value for money.


I think the first thing to say about this dish is delicious. I know that might sound stunningly obvious, but it just was. Oozing with flavour in fact; the kind of flavour that just makes you want more and more. I can’t say that I’ve eaten a lot of pheasant in my time, but think after this little culinary wonder, I think I might be eating it a lot more in the days to come. Whether or not future pheasant dishes served in other restaurants live up to this high standard, we shall just have to see.

Presentation? Loved it. Colourful, interesting, different and not overpowering. So, adding together delightful, cosy, rural Westcountry ambiance, friendly staff, great ales and a knockout, value for money seasonal dish, I would say that was a jolly big success. Well done to owners Paddy & Sally and Chef Ed Heard and his team. Keep on doing what you’re doing, and I’m sure we’ll all be happy for eons to come!

6 Amazing things to do in Delhi, India!

Lodhi Gardens

Delhi, with a population of more than of 25 million, is one of the mega cities of South Asia. And if you haven’t been yet, then you really should go. I’ve flown into the nation’s capital more times than I can remember, and yet it still retains a certain magnetism for me. Delhi is an ideal place to start your exploration of India, because there are so many other places within relatively easy reach. However, before you start trekking the length and breadth of India, stay a few days in the city and see what it has to offer.

Probably the best way of seeing the sights of Delhi is to either take a bus tour or hire a taxi for the day. There are plenty of agencies around the city catering for tourists that can offer you both. If you go for the taxi option, agree the fare for day before you leave and pay the agency. Alternatively, you could shell out a bit extra and book a tour online:

However, here’s my recommended ‘must see’ list. I hope you find it helpful

  1. Rashtrapati Bhavan

The Rashtrapati Bhavan, otherwise known as the Presidential House, was designed by the renowned British architect, Sir Edwin Lutyens in the early 20th century. Built originally for the Viceroy, it now houses the President of India. Built from red and cream sandstone, it is striking in it’s appearance and makes a good starting point for your tour. Bordered by government offices on either side of Rajpath, you can simply view the Rashtrapati Bhavan through the black iron gates, and the tall Jaipur Column that stands sentinel in the foreground. Or, you can arrange to explore the presidential buildings, grounds and gardens by visiting:

  1. Qutub Minar

The construction of this red sandstone tower was completed in 1193 by the Delhi’s first Muslim ruler, Qutb-ud-din Aibak. It was built to commemorate his military victories, and standing at 73 m it is definitely worth a look-see. Once upon a time you could actually go inside and climb to the top, but when a stampede killed 45 people inside the tower during a power failure in 1981, it was closed to the public. Continued fears for public safety have kept the interior closed to this day because of the sheer height of the tower.

But you can still experience it’s impressive dimensions, and marvel at this neck craning piece of ancient architecture at ground level. With some interesting ruins and delightful gardens to explore, it’s definitely worth asking your driver to apply the handbrake. Don’t forget to call into the government emporiums during your tour to pick up those all important quality souvenirs, although you will buy cheaper from street vendors.

Rashtrapati Bhavan
  1. Lal Qila

Lal Qila, the Red Fort, was completed in 1648 by Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, in what is now called Old Delhi. This same emperor commissioned the Taj Mahal at Agra in memory of his beloved wife, Mumtaz. You cannot fail to be impressed by its lofty sandstone walls and battlements, which stand as mute testimony to the ruling Muslim dynasty across Northern India at that time. Accessible from Netaji Subhash Marg, the road running past the front entrance, the fort sits on the banks of the Yamuna River to the rear.

Worthy of your exploration, you can easily while away an hour or two roaming around the museums and fort grounds. Visit for more info. Be aware that every tourist hot spot tends to attract a myriad of street sellers flogging every souvenir conceivable. If you are not interested, just say no or if you like, then barter!

  1. The Lotus Temple

The Bahá’í House of worship is built in the shape of a lotus flower, and was opened in 1986. Whether you’re a follower of the Bahá’í faith or not, you will find the cool interior to be a restful haven of peace and quiet from the heat, noise and bustle of Delhi. The temple is set within manicured lawns and surrounded by nine serene pools of water. Be careful in the crowds outside temple though, as pickpockets can operate in the vicinity. Keep your hands on your bags and possessions to be safe.

  1. Lodhi Garden

Lodhi Garden, east of Nehru Park and located in the south of Delhi, is one of the green lungs of the city. If you want to get away from it all, and that’s only a matter of time, then this is the place to go. Romantic couples can be seen walking or sitting together on the grass, whilst others amble through and just enjoy the natural beauty around them. A wide bridge spans the lake there, and paved walkways invite you to delve deeper into this green oasis. The verdant seclusion in the heart of the city, provides peace and tranquillity and a welcome relief from the urban sprawl of Delhi. It’s very historic too as the gardens contain tombs dating back to the Sayyid and Lodhi Muslim dynasties of the 15th and 16th centuries, otherwise known as the Delhi Sultanate.

  1. India Gate

Built to commemorate the sacrifice that Indian troops made in WW1, it looks like an Asian version of the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, but on a smaller scale. Also designed and built by Lutyens, it is situated at the end of Rajpath and looks towards the Rashtrapati Bhavan at the far end. Flanked by the Children’s Park and the August Kranti Maidan on either side, it is a natural meeting point and a great place to gather socially. Here you will find Indian friends, couples and families coming to relax, chill out, get an ice cream or maybe indulge in some tasty street food. Again beware, as it tends to attract every street hawker imaginable, but it is a great photo opportunity and not to be missed.

Near to India Gate

Exmoor Live @ the Dunster Show 2017

Click on the link below to view a short, but highly entertaining video about this great event I was privileged to take part in. Video courtesy of Fly Monkeys Limited and Julia Amies-Green Photography. Enjoy!

Exmoor Live Cookery Demonstration, Dunster in Somerset

Photo courtesy of Julia Amies-Green Photography.

Shakespeare Outside…?


Now we all like a bit of Shakespeare, don’t we? Well, what about some Shakespeare outside then? That is exactly what you’ll get if you turn up at Shakespeare’s birthplace in super Stratford-upon-Avon, and wander through to the enclosed garden and courtyard at the rear of the property. Just call out your favourite play by the legendary bard, and the two or three assembled Shakespearean actors, suitably attired in period costume, will enact a pithy scene for your listening and viewing pleasure.

These guys (and girls), are real pro’s. Making it look so effortless and easy, the impromptu audience are lavishly entertained with scenes from ‘The Merchant of Venice,’ ‘The Taming of the Shrew,’ ‘The Tempest,’ ‘Romeo and Juliet’ – and everything in between. To be quite honest, I could have sat there all day and lapped up this eloquent street theatre (or courtyard theatre if you want to be pedantic), and that would have constituted a perfectly acceptable day out, with time well spent.


Give my regards to Broadway!


Nestling on the western edge of the Cotswolds, Broadway is a must-visit destination if you are in the area. Why? Because it’s beautiful, and it simply oozes English village charm. In fact, it’s almost too perfect and too twee for its own good, but I just love it. It’s got lots of those lovely, unique kind of shops that magnetically draw you inside, inviting you to part with large sums of money for no real good reason at all – except for pure self-indulgence of course.

We came across a chocolate shop, a sweetie shop (selling a seemingly endless variety of sweets), and a lovely wine and gin store tucked away up a side street. A visit here was required of course, and after much chat with a chap called Dan around various drink related topics, we succumbed to the temptation to sample some of the shops wares. The whole experience proved to be immensely satisfying.


Broadway is a little gem, of that there is no doubt. One look inside the estate agent’s window will solidly conform this fact. So if you should find yourself meandering towards Stratford-upon-Avon, as we were, I would encourage you to pop in and have a jolly good look around. You are bound to find something that takes your fancy!


To be or not to be, that is the question…

I am of course headed for delightful Stratford-upon-Avon, the home of Shakespeare. If you’re somewhat confused by the picture above, that is merely my geographical locator at this present time (Taunton Deane Services Northbound).

I was in Stratford less than three months ago, but I have to say that I am very pleased to be returning so soon. With me are three travelling companions, and I am sure we are going to have a blast. I’ll keep you posted!

Little Switzerland


Little Switzerland, well that’s what they call it anyway. I am of course referring to Lynton and Lynmouth, which sit happily on the North Devon Coast looking out towards the coast of South Wales. At somewhat of a loose end, I decided to park up in Lynton, and walk down the precipitous coast path to Lynmouth below. I have to say it is a fairly steep path all the way down (the ache in my thighs testify to this fact), but well worth it.

Lynmouth was buzzing as you would expect in the height of the summer break, with the August bank holiday just round the corner. I decided to make for the Rock House Hotel, accessed by a pedestrian bridge across the now united East and West Lyn Rivers. Here I was rewarded with a glass of chilled Elderflower Cider which was suitably refreshing in warm August sunshine.

There are in fact plenty of places in both Lynton and Lynmouth where you can not only enjoy something to eat and drink, but spectacular views of this dramatic coastline are virtually guaranteed. A word of warning though; the climb back up to Lynton is not for the fainthearted as it constitutes a good cardiovascular workout! If however, that all seems too much for you, then I would encourage you to take the cliff railway back up to the top. The single fare is £2.80 and worth every penny for the experience.